Potter Naoyuki Inoue / Casa BRUTUS #242 May 2020 / Special feature "ART & EAT"

Potter Takashi Yomiya / Casa BRUTUS #242 May 2020 / Special feature "ART & EAT"

taishoji / BRUTUS #910 Mar 2020 / Special feature "Kitchen"

talk: Ai Hosokawa

taishoji

KINMONKO / CREA #360 2020 / Hot Springs Feature

こどもたちがこどもたちの時代をこどもらしくいきいきと過ごせるよう

Text: Mitsuharu Yamamura

Miyama Sanso Yamamizuki
CREA

Miyama Sanso Yamamizuki / CREA #360 2020 / Hot Springs Feature

こどもたちがこどもたちの時代をこどもらしくいきいきと過ごせるよう

Text: Mitsuharu Yamamura

Miyama Sanso Yamamizuki
CREA

ANA Intercontinental BEPPU RESORT & SPA / CREA #360 2020 / Hot Springs Feature

The heart-melting infinity that unites the sky and the sea.

Original Text: Chiaki Tanabe

ANA Intercontinental BEPPU RESORT & SPA
CREA

WORLD HERITAGE / Casa BRUTUS #237 May 2020 / Special feature "Discover Sacred Place Tour"

CONTEMPORARY ART / Casa BRUTUS #237 May 2020 / Special feature "Discover Sacred Place Tour"

PASSION by KONGO: ART MUSEUM & LIBRARY, Ota

Prologue to the development of "creative Ota people".

Original text: Suzuka Miki (President's Office, Kongo Corporation)
Translated with www.DeepL.com/Translator (free version)

The platform of Ota's knowledge and sensitivity.

 The Ota City Museum of Art and Library is a complex facility that opened in April 2017 in Ota City, Gunma Prefecture. As a platform for knowledge and sensitivity to bring creativity to the city, the basic philosophy of the project is "Creative Ota people". In addition, it aims to become a base for city planning by the citizens while inheriting the wisdom of manufacturing that has been nurtured in Ota City. We interviewed Mr. Tomioka and Mr. Hoshino, who work at the museum, for this interview.

Until "something" is created in the vacant land.

 The Ota City Museum of Art and Library started this project with the hope of restoring the liveliness of the area in front of the station. Initially, there were no plans to build the complex as it is now, he said. Initially, the city planned a small gallery and café that would serve as a community space. It is because of the public's input that it has become what it is today.
 In order to improve the formulation of the basic policy by incorporating the opinions of citizens, a citizen survey was conducted at the city's libraries. What came up was the opinion of those who are raising their children that they want a place where parents and children can spend time together. The city's project members thought that a facility with more picture books and children's books would attract more people to use the facility.
 It's like a gallery and a library with a focus on children's books. In addition to those two things, we're going to have a café where people can easily gather," says Tomioka. They completed the basic policy with the image of creating a low-income cultural facility rather than a library. Mr. Tomioka's expression of "something like" suggests that he wants to provide a place where citizens can easily enter without any attitude, free and uncomfortable.
 It wasn't just the basic policy that reflected the views of the citizens. During the architectural design phase, workshops were held by the design firm and the public. This was the first time such an attempt had been made in Ota City.
 One of the symbols of this experiment is the zoning*1 of the museum and the library. According to the original plan, the museum and the library were separated. However, in the course of the workshop, some citizens suggested that the museum and library should not be separated, and that it would be more fun to have them together.
 It's not an easy thing to do with the public that would normally be done by a design firm alone. However, the far-fetched and unique opinions of the citizens lead to a space that is enjoyable for the users to spend time in.

KONGO
ART MUSEUM & LIBRARY, Ota

Omuta person-centerd concept book 2019

Navel of the future.

Partial excerpts of text from Omuta person-centerd concept book 2019
Translated with www.DeepL.com/Translator (free version)

Parson Centered is "navel".

For example, "A Japanese man in his forties, with a wife and two children, living in an apartment, owning one car, working as a section chief at a company on weekdays, enjoying futsal with his friends on his days off, loving to read speculative fiction, and not good at celery...

Even though more and more words have been piled on and some aspects have been revealed.
I can't represent all of you, of course.
Include more fluffy, muzzy, and gooey parts

Because you are composed.Until now, society has regarded human beings as ideal, rational and linguistic beings.
In other words, you were the one who lived by your "head".

but then ...
It's fluffy, messy, and gooey.
The sensory, instinctive, and non-verbal parts of the
It has been made as if it were something that does not exist.
If there's nothing specific that you don't want to do, but
If, for some reason, your days don't feel right, then
It may be a silent appeal from a part of the body that is not the "head".
However, they can't be captured by the "head".

"navel" has been in charge of important things that go beyond reason.
It is the center of the human being, the organ of the vital connection between people, and the
"navel" is also a place where you can gather your energy.
It is full of things that "head" does not capture.

We can live with "navel", and not let it disrespect you.
Doesn't this move us closer to a society where everyone can live well?
That is the aim of this book.
Omuta City, Fukuoka Prefecture, where this book is mainly set, is a
In the context of dementia care, we have been working on "person-centered care," which is listening to "navel" of the non-verbal human being.
If you look at the future of this or that from a "person-centered" perspective.
Familiar things take on a different value.
Communication with "head" is good, but from now on "navel" is also important.
"Navel of the future" has begun.

Translated with www.DeepL.com/Translator (free version)

I'll tell you, there's an empty semi in there.

There are times when it's hard, but it's okay to live in the now.

Omuta's aging rate as of FY 2018 was 35.9%. With the national average of 28% significantly higher than the national average, the city has declared its commitment to creating a community where people with dementia can live together, and has worked together with the private sector to create a community.
When Omuta City realized that what it had been working on through trial and error was what it called "person-centered care," it began activities to further deepen its efforts.

In "person-centered care", it is very important to listen to the narrative of the person himself/herself.
This is because we believe that important hints are hidden not only in the information we see in front of us at the moment, but also in the experiences we have had and the way we have communicated them.
Here, we spoke to an old woman who lives in Omuta.
Throughout the story, she realizes that one of the old women in front of her has the name 'Furuta Hatsuko'.

Out of equality comes reciprocity.

How do you deal with others whose reality is different from your own?

We listen to the narratives of architecture.

A gesture that comes from being yourself.

What kind of technology plays with the margins?

Masafuku / BRUTUS #873 July 2018 / Special feature "Fukuoka no Seikai"

an/other Tokyo, SHOTENKENCHIKU Nov. 2019

Accommoda
tion
as Media

an/other TOKYO
Interior Design: zig inc.

Visiting the great generals of Okinawa / Number #958 Aug 2018

Michael Leitch / Number #929 June 2018

There are no scary teams anymore.

House Made with Lime Plaster and Wood. / CONFORT #138 June 2014

The new house at the foot of the Hachiman Shrine.

Partial excerpts of text from CONFORT #138 June. 2014
Original text: Yuka Akikawa
Translated with www.DeepL.com/Translator (free version)

Using the land's cedar, earth, and stucco, the local craftsmen gathered together to create a small, comfortable house on the site of an old shrine. The client is Naoki Ezoe, who is involved in producing community-based businesses. This is the story surrounding the creation of that home.

Top: Ezoe's house, built on land that had been raised with masonry. The pale beige exterior wall is made of cement blended with just under 20% Hita soil. It was the straw ache that was mixed in, which gave it an almost earthy color. The torii on the approach to Ohara Hachiman Shrine can be seen at the back left. From here, a long staircase leads to the palace.

The steps create changes in the area, and the texture creates an atmosphere of "between".

Naoki Ezoe and his wife, Yuka, standing in the kitchen. The counter is a great place for family dining, as well as a place for casual conversation with friends. The floor is deep enough to meet the eye line of the person sitting in the living room. This step separates the relaxing space from the public space at the entrance.

Top of the top row: The largest side of the public wall is Lymix, a non-fired tile made by a local manufacturer, Tagawa Industries, which is made by hardening lime with high pressure. It has a moist, matte texture. Mr. Yahagi went to the factory and laid out a sheet of paper so that the surface would be rough during the pressing process, and the edges were also roughened to make a special order.

Bottom of the top row: the family study directly above the kitchen. The built-in desk is used by her sons, Shizuku and Soyogi on the left, and Naoki and Yuka on the right. There is no private room for the children, but they stay here in the evening to work or study and talk about the day's events.

The couple and Soyogi's bedrooms on the south side of the shared study. The walls are plastered with Hita clay. It is a little bit cooler than the one without straw sasa. I'm going to be able to get up quickly and not miss any sleep.

Location: Hita City, Oita Prefecture
Construction: January 2014
Structure and scale: Conventional construction method, two-story wooden building
Design: Masao Yahagi Architects & Engineers
Design Craftsman: Kazunari Machtani
Structural Design: Nawaken Gym
Construction: Sakuragi Sogo Construction
Plasterer: Harada Sakken

OPAM / BRUTUS #850 July 2017 / Special feature "A textbook for the enjoyment of architecture"

Oita Prefectural Art Museum
Designed by Shigeru Ban

The site where new fruits are born at Miyazaki. by 827 BRUTUS July. 2017
Special feature "100% FRUITS BOOK".

Look for the post "Taiyo no Tamago"!

Partial excerpts of text from 827 BRUTUS July. 2017
Original text: Ai Sakamoto
Translated with www.DeepL.com/Translator (free version)

Sweeter, easier to eat, and more functional... In order to respond to the insatiable desire of consumers, the development of ''new fruits'' is progressing day by day in each place.
In particular, what is Miyazaki Prefecture's attempt to focus on tropical fruit production?

Our goal is to be the only one that is unparalleled.

"Dogenka Sento Ikan (We have to do something about it.) ". Along with the phrase "Taiyo no Tamago" by former Governor Hideo Higashikokubara, which became a buzzword grand prize, the perfectly ripe mangoes from Miyazaki Prefecture (Taiyo no Tamago) became famous and popular. Nearly 10 years have passed since then, and the production of post "Taiyo no Tamago" has begun in earnest in Miyazaki.

Akane Yamaguchi TOKYO 2020 / Number #933 2018

A look at the true feelings of a yokozuna / Number #892 2016

Christmas lunch by Ai Hosokawa at NAGOMI Dec 2014

The most important thing is how to combine the materials.

To enjoy the hospitality.

Partial excerpts of text from NAGOMI Dec. 2014
Original talk: Ai Hosokawa
Translated with www.DeepL.com/Translator (free version)

The main course of today's party was steamed boiled chicken, a twist on a Christmas dish from the countryside of Florence, Italy, where I spent my apprenticeship.

In Italy, a castrated rooster called "cappone" is eaten at Christmas (lunch on the twenty-fifth), boiled or roasted. My homestay family used to cook it slowly on a gas cooker, but I cook it in the open and steam it. This is a recipe that I've been applying to a lot of different meats because it's easy to make, without fail, and it's definitely delicious.

I don't often make dishes at parties that require me to stir the pot all the time, even if it's the same stew. After all, we want to talk about the tape with our customers. If you do something too heavy-handed, you'll be exhausted and won't be able to continue. I don't cut corners, but when I entertain people, I try not to overdo it on a point-by-point basis. Today's dish is also easy, with no prep from the day before. All you have to do is "boil", "mix" and "pour".

The star-shaped pasta in steamed chicken broth was a favorite at Christmas in our house last year. The soup is only seasoned with salt.

Anyway, I don't want to put anything wasteful in my food. Naturally, I'm also conscious of the color, but I put it in because I need the taste and smell more than that. The most important thing is how to combine the materials.

Anyway, I don't want to put anything wasteful in my food. Naturally, I'm also conscious of the color, but I put it in because I need the taste and smell more than that. The most important thing is how to combine the materials.

Speaking of ingredients, vegetables here in Kumamoto have a stronger taste than those in the city. I often change my dishes after seeing them raw and tasting them. Since coming here from Tokyo, where there are many products from all over the world, I have become more sensitive to the sense of season and the seasonality of ingredients. The essentials are different, but there's no need to force yourself to buy something from a distant region and incorporate it into your cooking when there's something delicious near you right now. I think that's the same approach that was taken in Italy, and I think it's also applicable to Chakaiseki.

I always have a general idea of what the main course should look like, but I think of the menu by watching the flow of the party and working with my hands. Sometimes I ask a friend who is helping me, "Which one do you like better?" At home parties, I enjoy that kind of ripe feeling when I'm cooking.

Tankosha

Takeshi Sakamura #1 at NAGOMI Oct. 2015

Add the color of autumn flowers to your life.

Partial excerpts of text from NAGOMI Oct. 2015
Original text: NAGOMI
Translated with www.DeepL.com/Translator (free version)

Potato leaves and camellias grow in the shadows of the windowsill.

A potato leaf that turned red in late autumn. A single white camellia flower is placed in a small bowl with an uninhibited life force. I put it in so that it would be high enough not to hang on the window frame, and I made the most of the lines of the autumn grass by the light of the windowsill.

Add contrast to the floral space with a paving board.
The small glass vessels create a lively feeling of flowers and grasses.

I put white camellias in two ways against the white space.
In the photo above, a white camellia cedar leaf is placed in a Chinese white-glazed jar and contrasted with the vessel with a paving board. The paving board is a defect in an African Dogon door.
The photo below is a view of the wisteria vine in a small glass vessel. The vase is made of glass so as not to stand out from the rest, to emphasize the dynamism of the flowers and vines.

The green of the moss is reflected in the glass.

It's an image of a morning after a rainy day, when you can get some moss outdoors. In order to bring out the fresh autumn air, only water is placed on a small glass plate and the green of moss is reflected on the surface of the water. It is also beautiful to see shiny leaves fluttering into the ground.

Put a pomegranate nut and a branch on the mouth of the pot.

I placed the autumn fruits in the vessel of my choice. Here, ripe pomegranates and branches are placed on the mouth of a pot in a Sue ware. It does not require water. It's just a simple one, but even if it's in a corner of the room, the red color of the body and the movement of the branches will be reflected.

Put half dead pomegranates on the doorstep.

The pomegranate that remains standing and withers in late autumn, the welcoming flower with the lingering toadstool in a plum bottle. The plum vase, which matches the old style of pomegranates, dates from the Goryeo period of Joseon.

Withered and hydrangea in a Karatsu Tokuri.

It is the end of autumn, and the lace-like flowers of the hydrangea on the forehead. The pulley, which looks like a sheet of paper, is used to accentuate the view in the sake bottle of Karatsu. The sake bottle is by Morimitsu Hosokawa.

Green glass with Sarashina Shoma.

This green antique glass is filled with sarasana hemp that has taken on a wilted color from the leaf tips. To give it a relaxed appearance, I keep one type in clean.

Tankosha

Takeshi Sakamura #2 at NAGOMI Oct. 2015

The pleasure of flower arrangement of autumn flowers

Autumn, especially in late autumn, is a delightful time for grass, fruit, flowers and branches.

Throughout the spring and summer, rain and sunshine are stored in each plant's temperament, and they grow and grow, some of them growing and some of them disappearing into the soil. As the breeze and the sound of insects begin to rise from beneath your feet, it is the autumn of "Hanano", a season of colorful flowers and grasses that seem to have no name.

And more late autumn. The colors of the blooming flowers change, the ears that called the wind break, the fruit is torn by birds, the leaves are exposed to insects and rain, but only then does the true nature of each plant emerge and shine the most.

In these seasons, I abandon as much as possible the idea of arranging flowers and making shapes, and focus my attention on and listen to the thousand different ways in which plants speak to me. With a mind to scoop up the natural appearance of the wind, examine the vessels to be combined, then try to move quickly without hesitation and with few hands.

Faded, withered and broken, even its most distinguished appearance is a joy to be able to enjoy the flowers in autumn.

Original text: Takaehi Sakamura florist
Translated with www.DeepL.com/Translator (free version)

KYUSHU no SHOKUTAKU #30 Summer 2016

KYUSHU no SHOKUTAKU

KAZOKU Dec. 2014 by SOS CHILDREN’S VILLAGES JAPAN

Being raised by two families.

Partial excerpts of text from KAZOKU Dec. 2014
Interviewer: Masahiro Takata
Original text: Aya Endo
Translated with www.DeepL.com/Translator (free version)

There are about 47,000 children across the country who are unable to live with their families. However, it has been pointed out that this number is also the tip of the iceberg.
As soon as Mrs. Kakimoto was in the first grade, she moved away from her biological mother. She met her foster parents and lived as a foster child until she graduated from college. She then left her hometown to live as a company employee, got married and became a mother of one herself in June 2014.
"I'm happy to have a family, and now I'm happy to be creating one." Her voice overlaps the voiceless voices of the children.

The choice at age 8.

Please tell us how you came to be in a foster home.

  "The day after my elementary school entrance ceremony, I was suddenly taken by my grandmother to the Children's Advocacy Center. After spending about a month at a temporary shelter, she went to live with a foster family. After living in the forest with my foster parents for a year, I returned to my mother and lived with my mother and grandmother, but when my grandmother collapsed, I moved in with my mother. Then, for whatever reason, my mother ended up living with a man she was previously married to, and there were a lot of hard times after that. At that time, I was taken to the Children's Advocacy Center again, and I was forced to choose between the man I was living with and the foster home where I lived for a year, so I went to the foster home because I wanted to."

Do you remember the events of your first day in a foster home?

  ”The morning after your first night at your foster home, you woke up and went to the bathroom. When I was living with my mother, I wasn't allowed to make any noise until she woke up. So I didn't want to make any noise because everyone was still asleep, so I didn't run water on them (haha). Shortly afterwards, my foster parents asked me, "Why don't you just wash it off? I don't know what to do... I've done the right thing, but why? But I couldn't say anything about it, so I just had to apologize. Also, he usually goes to bed with the lights off by himself, but at his foster home, when it's time to go to bed, he follows me to my bedroom, reads a book and then goes to bed. It was the first time I had ever done that, so I wondered why he was following me into my bedroom. I tried desperately not to fall asleep in the middle of it, because I knew that he was reading the book to me, so I tried desperately not to fall asleep (haha). I'm sure there was a lot of confusion over such differences in family habits."

About the bad idea of not being able to be here.

What are your thoughts on the difference between an institution and a foster home?

  "In my case, I've never been raised in an institution, so I'm guessing, but I think the difference between an institution and a foster parent is what the adult is making a living off of. When you're a foster parent, you have other things to do, and raising me is a private time. But in an institution, my job is to raise me. I think that's a big difference."

  "I think a big part of it is that when a child turns 18, if they were in an institution, they wouldn't be able to stay there, so they'd have to live on their own. In my case, I lived in a foster home until I graduated from college and was able to decide my path. However, when it came to whether or not I was able to rely on or coddle my foster parents on a daily basis, I was too shy to do so. I think I've finally become a lot more spoiled over the past few years."

The hurdle to "pampering" was high, wasn't it?

  "I think foster parents and foster children care about each other, but in my case, I was always worried that I wouldn't be able to stay. I thought that if she couldn't stay in her foster home anymore, she would have to go into a temporary shelter again and then live in an institution. I had toured the facility once, and it seemed very closed off, so I knew very well at a young age that it was very different from my foster home. I still remember living in a temporary shelter as a painful experience for me, and the thought of having to stay there for the rest of my adult life made me anxious. For a child, not knowing what he or she is going to become is a tremendous fear."

Tell us about how you came to be able to rely on a foster parent.

  "When I was in middle school, I thought that I would be alone when I turned 18, so I would go to a commercial high school so that I could get money right after high school. When I told both my homeroom teacher and my foster parents that I wanted to go to a commercial high school, they repeatedly suggested that I could go to an advanced school and go to college. However, it costs a lot of money to go to college, and it's also hard to live alone. I couldn't tell anyone that I thought that way, because I thought it was 'spoiling' to tell my teachers or my foster parents. I stopped studying because I thought it would be better if I couldn't study anymore. Then my foster parents noticed something unusual and asked me how I was feeling, and I think that was the turning point. Another important thing is that when I studied abroad, I realized that I could not do anything on my own and that I could not move forward unless I communicated my feelings."

The existence of my mother who gave birth to me.

What are your thoughts on the difference between an institution and a foster home?

  "What I'm most grateful to my foster parents for is that they raised me to like myself, to like people, and to not let me hate my mother. Her foster parents told her every time she came home that she was loved by her mom, that even though she couldn't see her, she always cared about you, and that she was such a good girl because she received her mom's love. I think that's what made me the person I am today. My foster parents have always been foster parents and have never tried to be my mom or dad. As a single educator, I feel that I have been nurtured."

  "I think a lot of foster parents are raising children who are in a similar environment and have similar problems, but every foster child is really different. The process and environment of becoming a foster child is completely different, and everyone lives with their own struggles, worries, and gratitude. That's why the adults want to listen to each child and their hearts.”

  "There were times when people told my mother that she felt sorry for her children when she couldn't raise them. I think negative opinions of such parents are commonplace in the world. But I don't feel sorry for myself as a mother's child. For a child, being denied a parent is a denial of his or her own existence. Even if you have never met the mother who gave birth to you, I hope that adults will respect the fact that her existence is irreplaceable to the child."

Are you still in contact with your biological mother?

  "I think that my mother's inability to raise her own children was more of an environmental problem than an individual problem. I don't have a husband, and my siblings and grandmother were close by, but my connections as a family were weak and I didn't have any support, so I had to raise my children while working mostly alone. No matter how great a mother you are, you can't raise a child by yourself if you think about how isolated you would be. I think it's important for the child that the mother not be isolated."

  "I have been interacting with them for a long time. For the first two weeks after the baby was born, my foster parents welcomed my mother and helped me with postpartum support because I was going to be a baby's grandmother. I was told for the first time about the time I was pregnant after the baby was born, and my mother, like me, had very hard morning sickness. She also told me for the first time that she was born prematurely and small. At that time, my mother was still married and had been working and doing housework until just before giving birth. My mother nodded her head with tears in her eyes."

  "In fact, I've always been afraid of having children because I thought I'd end up having them myself if I couldn't raise them. But little by little, I'm starting to think that I'm going to be okay because I have a lot of family and I have people I can rely on."

I grew up with a lot of people watching over me.

  "I have two families, and now I feel like I'm raising a third. Since I was a little girl, I've been wondering why I'm so happy. (haha). We all have one family, but I have two families. I thought it was great to have so many different experiences from everyone else (haha). It's carefree, isn't it? But I think the fact that my foster parents made me think like that was a big deal for me, for my mother, and for my third family."

What made you feel happy was the feeling of having so many people watching over you.

  "I think that's right. I think it means a lot to a child that their home is a safe place for them to be. Just because you get married, or have a child, or have a foster child, doesn't mean you can become a family. Each and every member of the family has the will to make the kind of family he or she wants to make. Only by accumulating these things can we become a family. I think that's what family is all about, isn't it?"

SOS CHILDREN’S VILLAGES JAPAN

"FRUIT" by Junichi Nishida #20 Sep 2015 at KURAHI NO OHESO

Pruning at the new moon, harvesting at the full moon.

Untranslated text: Noriko Ichita
Translated with www.DeepL.com/Translator (free version)

I was surprised by her words with such a grin on her face! What, you haven't decided?

"I always look at the ingredients and decide which soup to make.I just taste it as I make it, and if something is missing, I just think about what I should add."

I got married and moved to Kumamoto, and this year is my sixth year. The biggest change from when I was living in Tokyo is that my cooking has become more haphazard.

"In Kumamoto, vegetables are wonderful. We also have a small garden, and we get organic vegetables delivered to us twice a month. If you're up for it, it's relatively easy to spend your days eating only orgasmic vegetables. You never know what you're going to get, so it would be a waste if you didn't cook on a case-by-case basis, wouldn't it? In Tokyo, we used to prepare the ingredients by saying, "I'm going to make this," but here, it's more enjoyable to focus on the quality of the ingredients rather than deciding on various details."

In October last year, she published a cooking essay called "Soup". Here's a recipe for 32 servings of soup and the story behind it.

"Soup has a lot of nostalgia, but there are a lot of things you need to be aware of when making it. It's rough and delicate. That's what makes it so interesting.This soup with lumpy vegetables can be made into potage the next day, and it's delicious when it changes shape! I think..... It's that kind of flexibility that makes it so easy to make subtle changes with a little bit of skill."

As I listened to the story, the Chinese cabbage in the pot was half full.Put this in a blender and it turns into a fluffy creamer that looks like a mousse.

"At first, I was going to stir the Chinese cabbage and ginger together, but I did it separately. Drizzle the ginger creamer over the Chinese cabbage creamer and mix it on a plate to your liking."

This is how a soup that can only be made at the time of the day is made.  However, there are also some basic rules that are non-negotiable.The first thing to do is not to use so-called 'soup base'.

"If you add 'soup base', everything tastes the same...  Once you realize that, you can naturally make the choice not to use it. How do you get that ingredient-y goodness without using it?  I think."

For example, for minestrone, add a garden harp or a bouquet garni made of fragrant vegetables tied with octopus thread.  also picked a harp for my four-year-old daughter, Camellia, in the garden. Tsubaki, who loves to cook, knows how to follow her mother's steps.

In addition, it does not add any animal products such as meat.

"I know that it will taste better if I put it in, but it's my own personal challenge... I'd like to figure out how to make it tasty with only Chinese cabbage.  Every day is an experiment."

While making the soup, she tasted it several times. When the soup is cooked, take a sip of the soup.

"It's important to eat the vegetables you're making. If it were raw, it would taste like this. This is what it tasted like when I cooked it... Knowing this, you can make the 'next move'...  I guess the trick to making them well is to eat with a bang,"

Purple minestrone

While making the soup, she tasted it several times. When the soup is cooked, take a sip of the soup.

Chinese cabbage and ginger creamer

Sprinkle thin slices of ginger over the Chinese cabbage and place in a steamer. Stir each separately to make two creamers.

Tangerine soup

Soaking peeled mandarin oranges in water makes it easier to remove the streaks. This is a fireless dessert soup mixed with a variety of citrus fruits to add depth to the flavor.

"SOUP" by Ai Hosokawa / #19 KURASHI NO OHESO Feb 2015

The way of cooking soup is to enjoy the randomness.

There's nothing more nostalgic than soup.
There's nothing more free cooking than soup.
But...
There is no more delicate dish than soup.
So I'm tingling and tingling.
The delicate balance between moisture and solids can be seen in
I try to keep a quiet perspective.
'SOUP' (Little More)
Ai Hosokawa

Partial excerpts of text from KURASHI NO OHESO #19 Feb 2015
Original text: Noriko Ichita
Translated with www.DeepL.com/Translator (free version)

When you start making I can't imagine what the dish will be like. It's so haphazard. I've been able to enjoy it.

Tearing the Chinese cabbage by hand into a pot of 'stove'.  Sprinkle with thin slices of ginger and sprinkle with salt. When I put the lid on, she said, "I haven't decided how I'm going to make it from now on."

I was surprised by her words with such a grin on her face! What, you haven't decided?

"I always look at the ingredients and decide which soup to make.I just taste it as I make it, and if something is missing, I just think about what I should add."

I got married and moved to Kumamoto, and this year is my sixth year. The biggest change from when I was living in Tokyo is that my cooking has become more haphazard.

"In Kumamoto, vegetables are wonderful. We also have a small garden, and we get organic vegetables delivered to us twice a month. If you're up for it, it's relatively easy to spend your days eating only orgasmic vegetables. You never know what you're going to get, so it would be a waste if you didn't cook on a case-by-case basis, wouldn't it? In Tokyo, we used to prepare the ingredients by saying, "I'm going to make this," but here, it's more enjoyable to focus on the quality of the ingredients rather than deciding on various details."

In October last year, she published a cooking essay called "Soup". Here's a recipe for 32 servings of soup and the story behind it.

"Soup has a lot of nostalgia, but there are a lot of things you need to be aware of when making it. It's rough and delicate. That's what makes it so interesting.This soup with lumpy vegetables can be made into potage the next day, and it's delicious when it changes shape! I think..... It's that kind of flexibility that makes it so easy to make subtle changes with a little bit of skill."

As I listened to the story, the Chinese cabbage in the pot was half full.Put this in a blender and it turns into a fluffy creamer that looks like a mousse.

"At first, I was going to stir the Chinese cabbage and ginger together, but I did it separately. Drizzle the ginger creamer over the Chinese cabbage creamer and mix it on a plate to your liking."

This is how a soup that can only be made at the time of the day is made.  However, there are also some basic rules that are non-negotiable.The first thing to do is not to use so-called 'soup base'.

"If you add 'soup base', everything tastes the same...  Once you realize that, you can naturally make the choice not to use it. How do you get that ingredient-y goodness without using it?  I think."

For example, for minestrone, add a garden harp or a bouquet garni made of fragrant vegetables tied with octopus thread.  also picked a harp for my four-year-old daughter, Camellia, in the garden. Tsubaki, who loves to cook, knows how to follow her mother's steps.

In addition, it does not add any animal products such as meat.

"I know that it will taste better if I put it in, but it's my own personal challenge... I'd like to figure out how to make it tasty with only Chinese cabbage.  Every day is an experiment."

While making the soup, she tasted it several times. When the soup is cooked, take a sip of the soup.

"It's important to eat the vegetables you're making. If it were raw, it would taste like this. This is what it tasted like when I cooked it... Knowing this, you can make the 'next move'...  I guess the trick to making them well is to eat with a bang,"

Purple minestrone

While making the soup, she tasted it several times. When the soup is cooked, take a sip of the soup.

Chinese cabbage and ginger creamer

Sprinkle thin slices of ginger over the Chinese cabbage and place in a steamer. Stir each separately to make two creamers.

Tangerine soup

Soaking peeled mandarin oranges in water makes it easier to remove the streaks. This is a fireless dessert soup mixed with a variety of citrus fruits to add depth to the flavor.

KURASHI NO OHESO

KARASHIRENKON by Ai Hosokawa at Kateigaho 2014

The taste that the lord loved.

krank marcello / &Premium #30 Jun 2016 / Special future "OUR FAVORITE SHOPS"

Naomi Edamoto's food preparation / coyote #48 Spring 2013

coyote

Roast #1 Sep 2011

I think Karatsu is an interesting town after all.
A walk around the station, which goes about two miles, will take you to the ocean. You can go into town.
Also, there is an Edo period here and there in the town.
There is the Meiji era. There are Taisho and Showa.
Auntie's friendly smile on the front of the store.
You don't see many towns like this these days.

It may not have the convenience, flamboyance and novelty of the city. However, it is surrounded by the sea and nature, blessed with an abundance of foodstuffs, and people who are nostalgic and warm with humanity.

Karatsu would be more interesting if as many people as possible could empathize with the luxury and richness that can be enjoyed in such a place.

How wonderful it would be if, through various events and plans, we could spread the word about the charms of Karatsu, attract people who would respond to them, and eventually lead them to move to Karatsu.
We want to be a bridge for that.

I hope you will read our magazine and come to Karatsu first.
Follow your heart. I want you to walk, see, and feel it.
You can find Karatsu anywhere, but you can't find it anywhere.

#25 KYUSHU no SHOKUTAKU Spring 2015

KYUSHU no SHOKUTAKU